Named Clothing Tavlikki Sweater

Tavlikki front

After seeing all of Anne’s wonderful sweatshirt posts the last few weeks, I thought I needed one.  I really liked her version of the Tavlikki sweater, and, although I don’t really do pattern downloads as a rule, I did download this one!  It was worth all the printing and taping, and I am in love with the neckline.

Tavlikki back

I took note of Anne’s comments about widening the neckline, but I must have a smallish brain, because I didn’t need to add anything to get this over my noggin.

For the first time in my entire sewing life, I successfully overlocked clear elastic into the shoulder seams.

Tavlikki elastic

Catch me while I faint, I told myself.  I cannot believe this worked so perfectly!

perfect elastic

The fabric is from EOS – a “luxury sweatshirt fabric” that is soft, cozy and sooooo nice to wear.  It was my first time sewing sweatshirt fabric, and it was a dream to work with.  The sweater itself came together within a couple of hours.  The hardest part was ensuring the starburst darts were perfect.  I stitched them with my regular machine using a stretch stitch.

I cut straight size, no FBA, but I did grade up a size through the hips.  The first time I wore this, DD’s 1 and 3 remarked on how they loved the starburst darts and split hemline.  Those are the selling points of the pattern, right?

pic collage

I must say, though, it’s a bit drafty through the waistline with those hemline slits, so I usually wear it with a cashmere camisole, especially in such blustery weather as we’re having today!

Tavlikki sweater

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Burda 04/2017 #106: Joggers

Burda 04-2017-106 side

I made these for DD1 earlier this year from a medium-weight 100% tencel fabric, as she needed basic black pieces for a job this past summer.

Burda 04-2017-106

I made no changes to the pattern except to omit the waist ties, at her request, and she agreed to let me share them with you on the condition her face wouldn’t be seen. *sigh*  Her only other request was that they would be ‘loose’.  I cut the size to match her hip measurements.

And I managed to find black zips for the pockets, which made me very happy. Fancy zippers are not easy to source here. Here they are zipped….

Burda 04-2017-106 details

…. and unzipped.

Burda 04-2017-106 pockets

They turned out to be a little too casual for work, so she’s only worn them a couple of times. They were fun to make, and I’m pleased with the zipped pockets.

Burda 04-2017-106 back

Broderie anglaise: failure & success

I’ve had a beautiful silk/cotton broderie anglaise for a couple of years, and couldn’t decide what to do with it.  I had two pieces, for a total of about 2.5 metres or so.  What to do?  I can’t see myself wearing a dress made of this pretty fabric, although I really do like it.  But I needed some tops to wear for the summer, so I opted for two, the first of which was Vogue 8392.Image result for vogue 8392

And since it’s the Year of the Sleeve, I thought maybe I’d try that little trend, too. I underlined the top in a cotton voile, and bound the neck edges and opening with it.  Then I thought I’d get fancy with the sleeves. I purchased a 5cm wide trim to add to the bottom of the sleeve, and cut one flounce to make it, well, flouncy. It was so pretty!

Vogue 8392 sleeve

And it looked like a box on me. Ugh.  I dont’ know what it is about flounces, but I love the idea, and hate the reality of it on me. Maybe these aren’t just dramatic enough. Perhaps more flounces would have been better. But I don’t think it’s the sleeves that I dislike about this top.  I’m sorry I don’t have photos of it.  It was too horrible to photograph; I put it on, and took it off.

I think it was the neckline. This is the second garment I’ve made with neckline pleats, and I just don’t like them. The first one is this dress, and I haven’t worn it at all this year because I just hate how the neckline pleats add more bulk and volume above my chest than I’m comfortable with.  I was rather disappointed. I had hoped this would be a pretty top that I would like to wear. I’ve taken the flounces off the sleeves and put it aside for the thrift shop.  Perhaps someone else will think it’s perfect.

So, on to the next blouse, which I’ve made before out of silk chiffon, and quite liked.

Burda 10-2010-118 drawing

I did not bother underlining this.  I also cut the tie a bit in between the suggested lengths and considerably narrower than either version. This is with my previously-blogged pleated trousers.

Burda 10-2010-118, rolled trousers

I used French seams throughout the construction.

broderie interior

And, just to see if it’s really possible to tell the difference between a pair of brown capris (unblogged) and a skin-tone camisole, I took this picture. I was pleasantly surprised that slight differences in under layers won’t be too noticeable.

broderie underneath

This is another winner of a pattern, in my books. I’ve made this top three times, and never regretted any version of it. 🙂

Burda 4-2010-143 front

Another Vogue 1412

V1412 flowers back

This is my second version of the Rebecca Taylor top from Vogue 1412, this time in crepe de chine.  The trousers are Burda 12/2011 #133 in a polyester crepe from very deep stash, and fully lined in bemberg.133_1211_b_largeThis is the inside of the blouse front once the buttonholes and buttons have been finished.  This shows the true colours of the silk.

Vogue 1412 front interior

It’s a rather spring-coloured outfit, but I thought I’d share the makes even if it’s autumn.

V1412 flowers

I really like this top pattern, having made it twice. (The trousers are comfy, too. I made another pair in linen, which I’ll share later.)

Burda 08/2011 #136: Pleated Trousers

After the success of the last three slim fitting trousers, I wanted to continue experimenting with styles and silhouettes.  My bottom half is quite firmly in the Burda Plus range, unless I want to adjust patterns excessively (which I cannot be bothered to do unless severely pressed), so I thought I would trace off this little gem from Burda 8-2011-136 and see how it went.  I don’t always like the way Burda styles curvy women – the proportions are all wrong and the fit is always 1,000,000,000 miles off of anything a self-respecting woman with curves would want to wear, in my not-so-humble opinion.  But I was curious to see what some of the styles they put out in the plus range looked like on someone like me i.e. not young and statuesque.

Burda 8-2011-136 drawing

I chose to make this pair out of tencel denim from EOS. I had some misgivings about making trousers from the fabric, as it’s quite drapey, and my previous experience of anything tencel or rayon includes horrible wrinkling and pilling. But this is a medium-weight poly-rayon-elastene blend, tightly woven, and although I’ve been wearing the trousers all morning, you can see the fabric doesn’t really hold onto the wrinkles, thanks to the polyester, I’m sure.

I’m not completely comfortable with the style of these trousers on me. They are a rather loose fit, and I sometimes feel like they are too loose while I’m wearing them, but they look as though they fit well enough in the photos.  Opinions?

My tops change in these photos – I was trying to see what would look OK with the trousers, as I really like the fabric and I’m totally in love with the colour.  I find mirrors don’t often offer an accurate perspective on ratio or proportion. This is with Vogue 1093, a Donna Karan pattern that I made up in 2010, I think, and almost never wear because it’s just such a statement, and I don’t always like people staring at me as I walk through parking lots or whatever…

Burda 8-2011-136 Vogue 1093

You can see the top of a tank top made from silk jersey at the neckline.  I’m planning a post on that top shortly.

And me rolling up the hems for the next set of pictures….

Burda 8-2011-136 tabs

And what they look like with the tabs doing their job.  The top is Vogue 1245.

Burda 8-2011-136 rolled

I have to say, the inseam tends to roll down to my ankles after wearing them for a bit…

Burda 10-2010-118, rolled trousers

The front crotch depth is very long – I even shortened it as per my usual pattern adjustments – but check out this action shot. I noticed in the Burda magazine photo there doesn’t seem to be so much length on the model, so I really don’t know what happened.

Burda 8-2011-136

I love the details on the back. I left of the superfluous centre back waistband button tab. I just couldn’t see the point.  The pockets are faux, as I didn’t want the bulk of the pocket bags on my backside.

Burda 8-2011-136 details

And a close up of the hemline tabs.

Burda 8-2011-136 hem tabs

Well, whatever the fashion police verdict on these trousers is, they’re in my wardrobe, and I’ve been wearing them quite happily. I’m pleasantly surprised at how many random pieces in my closet actually work quite nicely with them.

How about you? Taken a style risk lately?

Vogue 1412: Zig-zag chiffon

Vogue 1412

Sometimes you hope fabric and pattern design work out, and you end up with a winner. This is a winner, in my books.  The fabric is from my stash, and again, it’s from EmmaOneSock’s roll end page.  It’s a lovely silk chiffon with a myriad of colours – my favourite fabric for tops because they will coordinate with any number of bottoms, colourwise, anyways.

There’s only two reviews for this blouse (View B) on Pattern Review, and I cannot figure out why.  Maybe the style isn’t for everyone, or the pattern version is off-putting?  Anyways, I love my version!Image result for vogue 1412I did find the instructions for the front a little bit confusing the first time I read through them, but I told myself that if I can decipher BurdaStyle’s cryptic English translations, then I could do this.

Here’s the inside of the front before the folding, buttons and buttonholes have been completed. I used silk organza for a stabilizer, something Vogue doesn’t suggest, which is ridiculous if you’re adding buttons and buttonholes.

Vogue 1412 interior

This is what the front looks like once it’s all been completed while being worn.

Vogue 1412 buttons

I did a sloped forward shoulder adjustment and an FBA. And I’m pretty chuffed about how I managed to match the bands of colour for this top. There were literally unusable scraps left.

Vogue 1412 back

Oh, and the trousers are the first pair of the slim Burda 01/2016 #135 trio that I made; this pair is made from a stretch cotton sateen purchased at my local Fabricland. I absolutely love the quality of this fabric.

Vogue 1412 zigzag chiffon

And, just because I hated the samples of the machine-stitched narrow hem, I did this shirt by hand.

zigzag hem

Still need a lot of practice, even if this is macro shot!

Vogue 1454

Thank you all for your kind comments on the last post.  You realize, right, that the topstitching on the previously posted trousers is now The Standard, which I shall drive myself insane trying to meet for the rest of my sewing life….. 🙂

Earlier this summer I went on a stash-busting spree. No particular motive in mind, except that I was so sick and tired of feeling ugly and underdressed. It started at Easter back in the spring, and I’ve been sewing up a storm, but never feeling like I wanted to photograph anything when I was wearing it. So I’m working backwards.

In August I took DD2 and DD3 on a month-long road trip to Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. I grew up in western Canada, and had a deep need to drive for miles under the open sky, wind through the mountain passes, and dip my toes into the Pacific Ocean. Along the way we visited Drumheller in the middle of the Alberta Badlands and home to the Tyrrell Museum. It’s ground zero for dinosaurs. Now, I’m not particularly interested in dinosaurs, but I do love the geography of the Badlands. It’s dry, windy, dusty, incredibly surreal and other-worldly. See?

V1454 B 1-2016-135

I’m wearing the second version of the slim BurdaStyle trousers mentioned in the last post. The fabric is a stone-coloured stretch denim from EOS that’s been languishing in my stash for I can’t remember how long. It was a roll end, I believe, and there was just enough for these jeans. (Trousers? I always want to call them ‘trousers’, even if they’re made of denim, because they don’t have all the traditional ‘jeans’ details…)

This is a softer, stretchier denim than the peach denim in the last post. This was actually the first iteration of this pattern.

Burda 01/2016 #135 details

The top is from the last set of Donna Karan patterns that Vogue put out. I purchased it just because it was a Donna Karan pattern, and I’m glad I did. I love this top. It’s boxy, but it’s so comfortable and so fun to wear. I made it up from a linen blend from very deeeeeeeep stash. I honestly cannot remember where I purchase the fabric, and that’s saying something, because I always remember where fabric comes from.

Now, I really dislike fabrics that show the outline of undergarments, and this wasn’t quite opaque enough for me. So I self-lined the bodice, and used flat-felled seams to ensure nothing will ever get shifty.

Vogue 1454 flat-fell seams

But it didn’t quite work out in my favour at the hemline… lack of planning, I suppose, in terms of which direction the ‘fell’ went in the flat-fell. 😀 But it’s not really noticeable while I’m wearing it, unless you’re a fellow seamstress looking closely at details. Yes, this is the right side of the garment, looking at it from the front.  oooopsie…

Vogue 1454 hemlines

It was windy on the photoshoot, which worked in my favour, because it shows how the back flounce moves on this top.

Vogue 1454

Here’s another photo to show how much ease is built into this design. It made for a cool top in hot weather!

Vogue 1454 back

And a last one from the front. Like I said, it’s boxy, but I’m somehow liking this at the moment.

V1454