#jumpingintojune with red linen

Burda 06-2010-141 red linen

Well, I’ve gone and jumped on the jumpsuit trend, thanks to Chris at Said & Done and all the general silliness that led up to it.  Y’know, a late night, one comment, and then another, and a dare and here you are!  I have no memory of ever wearing a jumpsuit.  Or romper for that matter, so the last time I wore one must have been before the age of two.  And I have no photo proof of that, either, so for all I know, I never have worn a jumpsuit until today.  Actually, I had an extremely artsy roommate during my undergrad years, and she had a beautiful jumpsuit with fish skin leather accents.  I confess to stealing it when I knew she wasn’t going to be around once or twice.  But it always looked better on her and I always felt like an idiot wearing it.

For this project, I decided to keep it simple and go with Burda 6/2010 #141.  It’s a plus-sized pattern.  Yup.  I’ve officially crossed into plus-sized territory, and I wanted this to be a cut-and-sew make.  So I measured twice and cut once.

You know I’ve loved Burda pants blocks, and this is no different. Every measurement matched mine from crotch depth to crotch length, hip width to inseam fit. Without tweaking. How lovely is that? And here’s the proof from the back.  Even Mrs. Mole has gotta be happy with this one!

Burda 06-2010-141 back

I did do a 1.5 inch FBA after I shortened the bodice by 3 inches.  I could have shortened the bodice another inch – the blousing is a little too much for me, particularly at the sides.  And I kept the super wide legs and left off the shoulder straps. I thought I may as well go the whole hog on this one. Since it’s a jumpsuit.  And it’s red.

Burda 06-2010-141

I delved deep into my stash for this washed red linen.  It was washed and dried several times prior to cutting because I was hoping for that really washed linen softeness/drape.  Although it still wrinkles and creases like linen.  Looks best from the back!

Burda 06-2010-141 red linen back

I lined the bottom half with bemberg rayon to the knees.  I cut the lining on the cross grain, so the selvedge is the lining hem.  Less work for me and it doesn’t create unwanted ridges when the garment gets pressed.

lining

I treated the lining and the trouser part of the jumpsuit as one and used the bottom edge of the bodice to create the casing for the elastic.  Burda’s version calls for elasticated ties, but I’m always going to wear this with a belt, so I left them off and stitched down the ends of the elastic on either side of the CF, so that the CF waist is flat.

Burda 6-2010-141 pockets

My favourite thing about this pattern?  The pockets.  I love them!  It’s basically a welt pocket without the welt.  A long rectangular opening about 2mm wide that is topstitched 3cm from each end, leaving an opening for your hand.  I wasn’t going to bother with them, since pockets always add bulk around the hips, in my mind, but since fitting is almost non-existent in this pull-on garment, I thought I’d just keep them.  Coolest pockets insertion ever.  I’m super happy with them, and they don’t add that much extra stuff across the high hip…. I think.

Burda 06-2010-141 linen

The first of several dance performances for DD1 was tonight, and when she saw this, she insisted on my wearing it.  I honestly wasn’t going to, as it screams RED JUMPSUIT.  But I did, and it was surprising easy to drive in, sit in, walk up and down stairs in and it was cool in a hot stuffy theatre and warm in the cool evening dampness after the show.  I didn’t lose the top.  I didn’t trip over the super long-and-wide trouser hems and no one stared at me.  (Well, that I noticed, anyway.  People can be very discreet about side-long glaces.)  My DD’s loved it (DD3 has asked for one).  DH said nothing except, “Your pants are too long.  They’re dragging on the floor.” And a good friend raved about it.  Well, now I have a crazy jumpsuit in my closet.

Are you making a jumpsuit?

Brocade Trousers: Burda 9/2014 #113

Burda 9-2014-113 brocade pants

DD1 has fallen in love with the brocade trouser trend.  Actually, she fell in love with crazy printed trousers when they first appeared a few years ago.  And because she’s so much fun to sew for (and easier to fit than my own self), when she said she liked these trousers from Burda’s September 2014 issue, I told her I had had the perfect brocade for them in stash.

Burda 9/2014 #113 technical drawingI love picking up roll ends from EmmaOneSock.com, and helped myself earlier this year when I saw this beautiful French gold/silver/black brocade.  I had vague notions of what it would become, but when DD1 saw the trousers in the magazine, I knew the fabric belonged to her.  She agreed.  I used bemberg to line them, and silk shantung from stash for the belt.

Burda 9-2014-113 back view

I made no alterations to this pattern, except to take in the waist significantly.  I chose to leave the fullness of the trouser front, and take in the pleats.  The pleats are sewn through all thicknesses once the trousers are finished.

Burda 09-2014-113 waist pleatsI love the shape of the zipper flap.  Details like this make a project special.

Burda 09-2014-113 zipI attached the lining to the hem, bagging it slightly, in order to keep everything neat and tidy, and free from the possibility of getting snagged.

Burda 09-2014-113 lining hemI added hanging loops at the waistline.Burda 09-2014-113 detailsAnd a belt loop to keep the curved “belt” in place.Burda 09-2014-113 carrierThe belt extends from the CB, around the right side of the trousers and attaches at the left front pleat.  There are inseam side pockets – which I personally loathe, but they’re necessary!

Burda 9-2014-113 waist

They’re a flashy pair of trousers.  I must say, I quite like them, and I’m so glad this beautiful fabric has been put to good use.

Burda 9-2014-113 metallic

baby blue camoflauge

baby blue camo shorts (2)As promised, here’s some camo!  My youngest saw the baby blue camo and wanted capris.  I purchased enough to make shorts, too, and sewed those up first using Burda 7/2013 #105.  Burda 7-2013-105

Let’s just say I shouldn’t have deviated from the jean shorts pattern.  She has a very long hip measurement, and these shorts were barely decent – a good 6 inches below her waist – and she was not comfortable wearing them.  So I asked DD1 if she liked them, and she gamely tried them on.

baby blue camo backAfter taking in the waist, they fit perfectly, although she wasn’t sure about the fullness in the fronts from the pleats.  The tightly woven cotton fabric does have a bit of stiffness to it, which accentuates the pleats.Burda 7-2013-105 shortHowever, she’s been wearing them a lot lately, so they must be comfortable.  The pattern is a super-easy sew.  Burda 7-2013-105 side viewThey are quite short, and I added about 4 inches to the length. Shorts that hint at junk curves are not attractive.  The cuffs are a nice touch, especially with the camo fabric, I think.  Not quite what one would expect.  The only other change I made was to leave off the belt loops.  Next up, I’ll try to get a pic of the camo capris.

The shorts factory is open

I’m avoiding my blue dress while I make up summer weather appropriate bottoms for DD3.  She needed shorts, and she wanted them in denim, which is so appropriate since I’ve had a few runs at making a jean-style bottom recently!  Burda 6-2011-110 shortI used leftover yardage from my first pair of Jalie jeans for the dark pair.  I didn’t distress them – just focused on fun topstitching.Burda 6-2011-110 dark shortI used the trouser pattern Burda 6/2011 #110 and shortened the pattern to a Burda 6-2011-110amid-thigh length (inseam is about 4 inches hemmed).  DD3 is quite conservative in her choice of style, and doesn’t like short shorts.  I chose this pattern because of the 5-pocket jean styling, and because it’s drafted for non-stretch fabrics.  Both my fabrics are stretch denim, but I wanted the extra wearability factor, which (I hope) will mean they will still fit her next year.  She’s only 11 years old, but she’s as tall as I am and wearing the same size as DD1, who turns 16 this month.  She’s going to be a taaaaaall girl.  (I’m jealous in a proud sort of way.)

Burda 6-2011-110 detailI put the coin pocket on the patterned denim, although you can’t see it at all and it’s too small to be functional for anything other than a coin.  DH thought I was out of my mind trying to match the motifs for the back pockets and suggested it would be better if I centred each one over a motif and just applied them whichever way.  Here’s the result:Burda 6-2011-110 patterns pocketI think that pattern is so busy no one would pay attention to these details while they’re being worn.  Lucky for me, because I’m not sure his idea worked to my satisfaction!  And just ‘cuz this is a sewing blog, here’s one of the two fly zips. Burda 6-2011-110 patterned denim shortsNext up on her summer wish list:  blue camo!

Ikat Trousers & Metallic Jersey

Burda 10-2013-140 ikat frontI completely fell in love with this fabric when EOS was having a roll-end party a few months ago, and decided I needed a pair of trousers of this stretch ikat brocade.  These trousers have been sewn and waiting for wear since the end of December, as part of my Burda Challenge 2013, so I thought I’d finally blog them.

I confess to still not having a perfect trouser pattern block.  Recently I learned about points of measure (POM) that are necessary in the RTW and pattern making world.  Apparently, the POM at 2 inches up from the bottom of a crotch curve should equal 6 or 7 inches between CF and CB when laying out the pieces flat with the crotch a continuous curve.

Let’s just say that NONE of the trouser patterns I have made to date have that measurement, which probably explains a lot of my fitting problems.  However, I’m getting ahead of myself: I learned this little VIP piece of information after finishing these trousers.  This post is about Burda 10/2013 #140, which is for stretch leather skinny trousers.  Well, stretch anything should work, right?  And at the time I sewed up these trousers, I was pretty dayum proud of tweaking the fit of my butt.

I attempted to tackle the fit with the help of this incredible book on fitting after reading about it on A Challenging Sew.  Can I just tell you this is a gold mine?  O.  My.  Goodness.  It’s the bible of fitting.  Amazing.

fitting and pattern alterationWell, I spent hours trying to imitate my personal shape on paper with the help of a flexible ruler, and came pretty near close to it.  I didn’t capture any photos, but the lining for these pants FIT WITHOUT ANY WRINKLES ANYWHERE.  I was gobsmacked.  First time ever without wrinkles in trousers other than an 80’s loose-fitting dress trouser.  Unfortunately, these stretch trousers are not so jaw dropping.

Burda 10-2013-140 sideI only half-lined them to the knees, and I wish I’d done a complete lining because the fabric isn’t the most comfortable to wear next to the skin. I wasn’t sure about the skinny legs of this pattern, so I straightened them out a bit.Burda 10-2013-140 ikatBut you can see the inseam is pulling up. I’m not quite sure what to do about that yet. Aside from that, the fit is comfortable and I’m pleased with it through the hips, but I’m not crazy about my straight-leg adjustment.  Maybe I created the problem with the inseam by beginning my widening of the skinny above the knees? Perhaps they’d be better if they just stayed skinnines.

Burda 10-2013-140 frontI’ve no intention of wearing these as everyday trousers – they’re a little attention-grabbing for me, and I haven’t figured out the right top or shoes (definitely not the booties I’m wearing in these photos).  They need something like stilettos or kitten heels.

Maybe I’ll pair them with this top that I haven’t yet shown the light of day.  It’s another garment from my Burda Challenge 2013 (Burda 12/2013 #119a).  I thought these two would be a fun holiday outfit when I initially sewed them but I never got around to wearing them this past holiday season.Burda 12-2013-119aThere’s a lot of fabric in the front cowl – about triple what one would usually expect in a draped cowl neckline – but the excess is a nice touch in a party top.

My fabric is a metallic bronze jersey that was BOG2, and I have enough to make a maxi skirt for the fun of being over-the-top.

I made two changes to the pattern.  I added strap keepers at the shoulders because the neckline is very wide. I will narrow the lower band by about 4 inches, since this is more flattering (I think) to my short waist.  Nine inches of close-fitting band around my upper hips is unthinkable.  I’ve just folded it up in these pics, hence the inconsistency from photo to photo.Burda 12-2013-119a belted partyWell, I’ve got a new party outfit for the upcoming holiday season eight months hence.  Now I just need to adjust those inseams and find a different pair of shoes.

Plaid Midi Skirt: Burda 10/2010 #117

 

Burda 10-2010-117 plaidI seem to be blogging all the winter stuff now that it’s spring.  This is the big skirt from Burda’s October 2012 issue.  DD1 wanted it made up in this gorgeous teal blue/grey plaid for her winter wardrobe.  Burda 10-2010-117 sideOf course I was happy to oblige. Who doesn’t love a simple make?Burda 10-2010-117 backAnd who doesn’t love a fabric hog of a skirt?Burda 10-2010-117 side 2

I think my favourite feature it the deep pleats on either side of the flat centre front panel, giving the illusion of an overskirt.The waistband is a simple petersham ribbon.  It was a bit of a challenge fitting the yards of fabric into the waistline.Burda 10-2010-117 skirt (2)Especially since I decided to add a lining cut as long and wide as the skirt instead of streamlining it down to reduce bulk.

Vogue 1054: Rucci Trousers

Vogue 1054 pantsI’m still on the hunt for trousers I’m wanting to stay with for the long haul.  I’ve had a lot of short-term relationships with most of the trousers I’ve made, so I thought I’d give these a try.  I only own two pairs of casual trousers and find myself wearing them repeatedly during an average week, and I thought it would be fun to see if these actually fit a curvy girl like me given all the design elements so I can have a new pair of trousers to wear.

Vogue 1054I made these up in a stretch cotton sateen, which is one of the suggested fabrics – minus the stretch.  The shine highlights every single possible hint of a flaw, never mind the actually fitting issues.  Completely unwearable and not a keeper in my books, so they’ve already gone to the thrift shop for some lucky person who probably won’t know she’s wearing a Chado design!!!

Anways, since I went to all the trouble of finishing these, I thought I’d share my thoughts about them. First of all, I’ve never inserted a zipper this way.  Yup, the fly is finished.Vogue 1054 pants zipperAnd the instructions never do mention that one needs to trim that extra length of zipper before attaching the waistband.  However, once it’s all trimmed and stitched, this is what you’re left with.Vogue 1054 finished zipIsn’t that gorgeous?  It’s probably one of the more visually pleasing front flys I’ve ever done in my sewing life. Vogue 1054 frontHere’s the inside view of the front.Vogue 1054 zip fly

The pockets are part of the front yokes.Vogue 1054 pocketsAnd the reverse corners were fun.  The details always make a sewing project more pleasurable, imho.  Plain and simple gets tedious after a while, and this pattern is not simple or boring by a long set of instructions.Vogue 1054 reverse corner front Beside the unmentioned need to trim the zipper, there were a couple of notch match-ups that didn’t happen properly in the lining.  Vogue 1054 lining mismatchThe side/yoke pieces double notches didn’t match up on the back pieces, as you can see above, and the same little problem popped up on the front lining piece along the top seam with the notches on the yoke.Vogue 1054 lining yoke mismatchThis wasn’t a good fabric for these trousers, although it was a luxury to sew.  It exaggerates every single wrinkle possible.Vogue 1054 sideThe back patch pockets are flattering.Vogue 1054 backThe legs are very straight, and on a curvy person, that can appear wide – something I’m not too sure about.  I felt they were very dressy trouser-ish while wearing them, and I can’t decide if that’s because they were lined or roomy or a combination of both.  Vogue 1054 shinyI wasn’t sure about altering these trousers, so I cut them according to Vogue’s size recommendations, and they are roomy.  I suppose the stretch factor didn’t help, but they could have been a full size smaller, which I’ll do the next time.Vogue 1054 front (2)And the crotch curve needs some altering for the next pair, but I wasn’t going to futz with these, and I was prepared to finish these, try them on and give them away if they weren’t a perfect fit due to the poor fabric choice.  Silly, I guess, but I had no problem finishing them up beautifully to pass on after wearing them for one afternoon.  Blame it on a new pattern with 69 (sometimes tricky) steps

Final verdict:  What an amazing trouser pattern.  I cannot wait to find the perfect fabric to make these up again.  Patterns with a thousand little details always make my sewing room a happy place, and these are the perfect ticket to happy detail sewing in a trouser pattern.

lurex tweed skirt

lurex tweedI made this skirt a couple of weeks ago, and only just wore it today.  It’s part of my TULE (tying up loose ends) plan, which is due April 30th, but won’t be done by then, barring some miracle of time and motivation.

I didn’t quite have enough to cut out the entire skirt (it’s OOP Vogue 1838 by Claude Montana) so I pieced the bottom of the back with pleats.skirt pleated fishtail (2)Here’s the inside:skirt pleats interiorThe hem allowance is a faux Hong Kong finish with the lining fabric, which doesn’t have the pleats – just a simple hemmed slit held in place with a thread chain.thread chain (2)I used petersham ribbon for the waistband and hand picked the zipper.zip and waistbandIt’s a simple basic skirt that will get a lot of wear next winter.basic skirt

winter dessert: cake’s pavlova

Pavlova Glen plaidPavlova, that is.  I must confess I’ve never actually eaten pavlova, so it was fun to sew pavlova.  I’ve read through many recipes, seen it on other peoples’ dessert plates and heard them rave about it, but I’ve never tried it myself.

I wanted to sew up Cake’s version of Pavlova ever since seeing Steph’s winter version in glen plaid and ivory wool.  So here’s my version.  First, the standard mug shots so you can see my bad posture and a variety of footwear.  I wasn’t sure what suited this outfit best, and I find pictures often tell a different story than the mirror. pavlova front 3       Pavlova side     pavlova back 2

The skirt is super swishy, which is always fun.  I thought I’d feel a bit twee in this silhouette, but it looks OK.  I confess to feeling a bit larger than life in it, but the pics tell a different story. I let the wool cure on my dress form after cutting the skirt for about a week before I finished it.  I do NOT want that hemline to travel south. The skirt hem is finished with lace, and I put in a bemberg lining.pavlova hem laceI changed the waist binding to a rather wide waistband – probably close to 2.5 inches –  which flatters my shape better and feels a bit corsety.  And the pocket is lovely.  Even my DH commented how much he liked the entire skirt – “and that’s a nice pocket” – when he saw it on my dress form.waistbandI faced the waistband with red/black shot taffeta instead of the wool plaid.red taffeta waistbandThe top is a lightweight RPL from my local Fabricland.  I looked all over the globe via Google for ruby or burgundy merino wool knit, but really didn’t want to pay it.  Maybe next year, if my youngest doesn’t take this top for herself. And look! It doesn’t gap while changing shoes!no gap Pavlova topThe top was an hour or two in construction time.  I’d say it’s a big bang for the time investment. I can think of a few bottoms in my closet that would love this top for a companion. Next time I’ll make a long-sleeved version, although I was wondering about making this up for spring/summer in much shorter sleeves.  Cap sleeves, maybe?pavlova swish (2)So there’s my first go at anything pavlova.  Have you made this up? What did you think?

it’s still a jungle in here

jungle januaryA construction jungle, that is.  STILL.  And since I’m being slowly eroded with the endlessness of this project, I sewed up a little bit of animal print to help me feel at home in the mess. This lovely little ensemble accomplishes three things:

  1. let’s me in for a play date at the Jungle January playground;
  2. brings me one step closer to completing my Burda Challenge 2013; and
  3. Burda 11-2013-130checks off two of a 3PAC for the Stitcher’s Guild Algebra SWAP 2014.

My ensemble is the designer pattern from Jo No Fui (Burda 11/2013 #130).  I made it up in a black stretch wool suiting for the skirt and an animal print silk charmeuse with an all-over fleur-de-lis burnout pattern for the blouse.  Let’s talk about the skirt first.

I was a bit skeptical about the extra yardage that drapes at the CF, but I like it. It doesn’t add bulk to the silhouette – it’s very clearly a pretty drape.  Burda 11-2013-130 frontThe wool I chose is perfect for this – it’s about the weight of a heavy silk crepe – and sewed up like a dream.  There is a small hip yoke piece instead of darts in the front.  The CF seam is sewn wrong sides together with the drape finished beforehand.  Burda 11-2013-130 jo no fui

The back of the skirt is simple.  It’s short – only about 19 inches in length – and cut straight.  I added a waistband instead of the facing, pegged the bottom by a total of 4 inches and added a full lining.  I likey this skirt.

Burda 11-2013-130 blouseAnd now the blouse.  Of course the star feature is the sleeves with the deep 4 inch pleat to keep the excess fabric at a decent length.  As it was, I decided to shorten the sleeves by 3 inches in total just to avoid the potential of dragging through dinner or what have you.sleeve pleatI added small squares of organza on either side of the pleat for stability and strength. I don’t want those tacking stitches tearing a hole in the middle of my sleeve, thank you very much.  The bottom of the sleeves are gathered into a narrow binding that just barely fits over my hands.  I’m not complaining – I actually like the smallness of the opening.  I think it will help keep the sleeves at my wrists.organza sleeve interiorThe instructions for binding the CF and CB slits were just asking for punishment, as far as I was concerned.  The binding strips were cut on the bias, and I should have known better and just cut them on the straight grain like one would finish a placket.  But what the hey!  I finished the neckline entirely by hand because of the finicky quality of the bias, but mostly because the charmeuse handled differently than the burnout chiffon sections in the fabric and it was just simpler to do it by hand instead of swearing at my machine.Burda 11-2013-130 bindingThe back binding extends into a loop for a button while the top of the CF slit is completely bound by the bias.  It’s a low opening, too, despite the high crew neck. Burda 11-2013-130 blouse neckline I had initially thought I’d make up a Ruby camisole in the same fabric for modesty (chiffon sections of the silk) and to prevent wardrobe malfunctions with that CF slit but the crossover of the cami doesn’t quite do the trick at this point.  Some adjustments are required before I actually wear this ensemble out in public, and I will probably also sew the bottom inch of the slit closed.leopard ruby As you all know I was a little sewn out after (almost) completing the Burda Challenge 2013, and although I want to finish it (yes, I’m that stubborn), I have a long queue that I’d like to catch up on from the last couple of years that has been pushed aside to make way for other projects.  And a lot of fabric that I would love to wear.  These are the more immediate items that come to mind:

  • Pavlova skirt & top
  • Marfy 2922 jacket in a lurex wool/silk tweed
  • Harris Tweed coat (originally part of my SWAP 2012)
  • finish the Burda Challenge
  • do something for Jungle January
  • participate in PR’s Little White Dress event
  • SEW A RED DRESS

So after sifting through all these nebulous ideas wafting around my sewing room, and reading through Ruth’s post on the SG’s Algebra SWAP 2014 rules, I realized I could fit everything in my year(s)-old queue into a lovely little plan. The more I thought about this little SWAP, the more it gave me the impetus to start sewing after the December rush and holidays.Burda 11-2013-130 backAnd this little ensemble has started me off beautifully.  But more on the SWAP in my next post.