EuroCup 2016: Team Portual Bomber Jacket

Back in the fall of 2015, I participated in the 2015 PR Sewing Bee.  The last challenge was making an Olympic team uniform, and this was part of my submission.  I thought it would be fun to blog it now that Portugal is playing in the EuroCup semi-finals today.

I made the skirt, trousers and top as blogged in my previous post.  This is the first bomber jacket I’ve made, and I thought it would be fun to pull out all the red silk and linen scraps in my stash to make up this John Richmond bomber-style top from Burda September 2013.  And it is not the most simple with a gazillion pieces, but it worked perfectly with all my little pieces of red.

Burda 09-2013-130I used red linen from my jumpsuit for the front bands and collar; a cotton-silk voile for the lower jacket, upper front and sleeves; and a rayon plisse (a double-layered fabric where the pleated fabric is loosely attached to a flat back) for shoulder and side constrast sections. The centre back panel and elasticated sleeve and bottom bands are made from silk taffeta.  Here’s the front. You can see the contrasting fabrics with the piping.  The single welt pockets are silk taffeta, too.

Burda 09-2013-130 piped

Here’s the back view.

Burda 09-2013-130 back

The sleeves have a pleating detail, which is just beautiful.  I made the lining for the sleeves separately instead of pleating all layers together as one.

Burda 09-2013-130 sleeves

I did a double row of piping around each section using gold and green silk shantung.  Labourious, tedious, and quite satisfying, for sure, once it was done.  This is a close-up of the back shoulder (from L, clockwise:  silk taffeta, rayon plisse, silk-cotton voile).

Burda 09-2013-130 piping

I’m not a big bomber jacket fan, but this is so luxurious to wear, and doesn’t advertise it’s patriotism too loudly, which suits me.  Back view, waving my flag.

Burda 09-2013-130 and 02-2006-137

Here’s the interior. I fully lined the jacket.  The body and sleeve linings were sewn as separate pieces.  I put the sleeve lining/fashion fabrics together, added the sleeve elasticated cuffs, and then stitched the sleeves to the jacket body.  The armscyes are bound with gold and green silk shantung.  The facings are linen.

Burda 09-2013-130 interior

Here’s a side view.

Burda 09-2013-130 side

If Portugal wins this round, we’ll be downtown at my MIL’s in Little Portugal on July 10th, cheering frantically for them to win.  If they don’t, I have some pieces to wear when I feel a bit Portuguese.  🙂

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EuroCup 2016: Team Portugal Tee

With EuroCup in full swing, and living in a Portugal crazy household (my DH’s family is Portuguese), I thought some red-gold-green would be timely on the blog.  Let’s start with a TNT tee pattern, Burda 02-2013-126, in an appropriately patriotic colour block.

Burda 02-2006-114 khaki

I have always done the neck binding by folding a strip in half, stitching it right sides together to the neck edge, finishing the edges, pressing the seam allowance towards the garment and edgestitching it in place.  This time I followed Burda’s instructions and actually bound the neckline.  Slowly, carefully, and with a little unpicking here and there it worked quite nicely.

Burda 02-2013-126 Portugal

I added a skirt made from a stretch cotton and trousers. The trousers have since left my house because they were too wide and sat too low, and were too straight-legged and I just couldn’t be bothered altering them to fit properly because I didn’t like them enough in the first place.  Well, I liked the line drawing and the idea, but….

Portugual ensemble

Both patterns were from Burda 2006 issues.  I actually bought the skirt issue (February 2006) after coveting Allison’s version in denim a year ago.  It’s become my favourite summer skirt this year, edging out the wonderful Vogue 1247 for most wears so far this season.

I’ll be happy to wear the shirt in when Portugal plays in the semi-final next week.   And if it’s too cool for a tee, I’ve made a red-gold-green bomber jacket, which I’ll share in detail next time.

A Plethora of New Tops

MMM15 Day 12-2

So I’ve been sewing up a few new tops.  The first one is Burda 7/2012 #136, without the ties.  No comment on the ties.

134_0712_b_largeI’ve been wanting to use fabrics I’ve been collecting over the last few years, and this combination of 14 oz rayon-lycra jersey in oatmeal and the scraps from my chocolate Burda 1/2013 #119 seemed to fit the bill. The chocolate jersey is 11 oz, and it doesn’t have the heft of the oatmeal fabric, but it manages. The bands are cut on the cross grain, on a fold, so the folded edge is the neckline. I had to do some tweaking to get the angles of the shoulder, CF and CB seams just right in order to feel secure in this top. The neckline sits (quite) wide. I ended up putting bra keepers in the shoulder seams just for added peace of mind. If you look at the Russian Burda site, lots of versions of this sexy neckline just slip off shoulders coyly. I’m not so coy, so I made the shoulders secure.

Burda 7-2012-136 side

The next top is my go-to for tees.  I just love the fit, neckline and little gathered raglan sleeves of this design:  Burda 02/2013 #126.

I have two versions that are new to me.  First, the crocodile print.

MMM15 Day 6

And then the polka dot one, upcycled from my purged McCardell dress.

MMM15 Day 7

There was so much fabric in that skirt, that I also made a second version in a bigger size of Burda 09/2011 #106. I don’t know what it is about that dotty jersey, but I just love it. Must be the combo of chocolate and olive.

And last, but not least, this little number from Burda 06/2014 #103. 103_062014_b_largeI didn’t quite have enough linen fabric to cut the required length, since this came in a package of roll ends from EOS.  So I added tiers to the bottom.  It’s rather loose, contrary to what the photos look like, which is a good thing.

Burda 6-2014-103 linen top

Here’s a detail shot of the shoulder.

Burda 6-2014-103 liberty

The jersey is intersected by petersham ribbon, which has been edged with bias binding.  It creates a structure from which the jersey literally hangs.  Brilliant.

Burda 6-2014-103 trim back

I used a Liberty Arts Fabric print, and I cannot for the life of me find the name of it.  If you know, please share it in the comments!

Burda 6-2014-103 linen top back

I love the linen jersey.  It’s so light and comfy and luxurious.  It was a PITA to cut, though, because the grain was all skewed.  In retrospect, I coulda/shoulda used petersham in a more contrasting colour to make the binding pop a bit more.  But this is subtle, and I’m happy to wear it, as I am all these new tops!  I did make up one more top in a coral jersey, but the pattern (and solid colour) was all wrong, so I thrifted it.  Well, five keepers out of six ain’t bad! And I’m happy to be sewing my stash!

Do you like sewing new tee patterns, or go for TNTs?

LATH Wardrobe: Maxi Skirt & Tee

Burda 2-2013-126 teeThese are the next couple of pieces in my LATH wardrobe.  I’ve made the tee up twice before.  You can see the op-art version here and the second version here. I didn’t have a lot of the graphic rayon knit – about one metre or so.  It’s a great pattern, although it tends to fit a bit on the snug side.  I added 2 cm at the side seams through the waist, tapering out to an additional 3 cm at the hips.  As mentioned in my op-art post, Burda’s binding instructions for the neckline are horrible.  I just cannot do a bound neckline in a knit or jersey to save my life.  (Mind you, if it was to save my life, I’d probably try a lot harder.) So I just did the simple sure-fire edging that always works for knits.neck binding

And what about the skirt?  It’s a simple two-piece pattern (Burda 1/2013 #116).  Not much to say.  The only changes I made to the pattern were to taper from waist to hip to make the skirt piece fit into the rectangular waistband.  The pattern is a bit on the straight side, and I require a larger hip:waist ratio than what was drafted.  Here’s a pic of the skirt’s waistband with the tee tucked in.

Burda 1-2013-116What else can I say about these pieces?  They’re both comfy and they look good together.   I’m liking the tee – it will go with many other pieces besides the LATH wardrobe.  And I confess to wearing the skirt a couple of days in a row because it’s just so easy to wear.

Burda lounge-around-the-house wardrobe

I’ve always had a hankering for making an entire Burda capsule wardrobe for some reason.  I just love how they pull together an average of 10-12 pieces and they all work beautifully together.  I recently cleaned up my sewing area a teeny tiny titch, and had the sudden impulse to sew a lounge-about-the-house wardrobe, courtesy of the February 2013 issue of Burda, after emptying out a large bag of knits that have been collecting over the last 12 months or so.  After laying them all out, I decided on this colour scheme:fabric choicesFrom L to R:  dark purple lightweight RPL, rusty rayon knit from EOS, graphic rayon knit from EOS, lavender lightweight RPL, and silk chiffon along the bottom. After shopping my stash, I decided I’d use the silk chiffon instead of the suggested silk satin.  It’s lighter in weight, and I’ll double it if necessary to match the weight of the knits if necessary.  I have 3 metres each of the light and dark purple, about the same of the silk chiffon and around 1 metre each of the print and rust knits.  Here’s my plan:

1. long skirt dark purple (Burda 1/2013 #116)

2. knit pants in dark purple (Burda 1/2013 #112)3. dress with chiffon in light purple (Burda 1/2013 #110)

4. cardigan with attached scarf in chiffon (Burda 1/2013 #114)114_0113_b_large

5. ruched long-sleeved tee with chiffon trim in rust (Burda 1/2013 #119)119_0113_b_large

6. short-sleeve tee in graphic print (Burda 2/2013 #126)

7. possibly a chiffon blouse (Burda 4/2011 #114)

8. and, if I have enough fabric left, this colour block top (Burda 7/2014 #114)114_072014_b_largeAnd that should give me a pretty good capsule wardrobe for fall LATH (lounge-around-the-house) wear.

*all line drawings courtesy BurdaStyle.com and Burdastyle.ru

Bronze Jeans: Burda 1/2010 #136

Warning: there’s a lot of pictures in this post, and, well, no amount of tweaking can make my 40-something mother-multiple-times exercise-free butt look younger, childless or hawter. Don’t say you weren’t warned. 😉

Burda 1-2010-136 frontI did it.  I crossed into the world of the unknown and I did it!  I cracked the jean mystery, peeps, and I am so EXCITED!  I have long scoffed at the idea of making my own jeans.  Whatever for?  What a hassle.  That’s just sewing geekiness.  Not interested.  bronze jeansBut the idea of making jeans has a way of getting under one’s skin and wandering through one’s sewing plans, and more than once I was coerced by Linda at EmmaOneSock to buy stretch denim.  For no reason except that it’s nice to have stretch denim in your stash, right?  No plans for jeans here.  Stretch denim can be used for a LOT of other clothing items besides jeans.  So you see it’s really not my fault that I made a pair of jeans.  The entire sewing universe has been conspiring to convert me.I’m so glad I did!  I feel like I’ve taken one major sewing step forward.  As I sewed this up, Burda 1-2010 #136cracking the big jean mystery one seam at a time, it was amazing to learn how simple jean construction is.  I used this model from Burda 1/2010 #136.I did not make a muslin specifically for this pair.  After sewing up my one and only pair of skinnies from the Burda block, I had a pretty good idea of what needed to be altered, so I measured myself from various angles very carefully, and then measured the pattern very carefully.  And re-measured.

I didn’t make any adjustments to the to the front, except to leave off that weird front patch between the front thighs.  Why it is there?  It looks…. well, uncomfortably embarrassing. Maybe their designers thought it would be interesting, but I didn’t like it.  Besides, can you just picture it in this bronze denim with dark purple topstitching?  *shudder*  Wrong visual.  BTW, the front crotch depth is good, but I’m not sure if the little extra fabric at the front crotch should be left or adjusted.  I need to think about that more.  It’s not uncomfortable and I don’t think it looks bad, but I still need to think about it from a “perfect fit” perspective.  Any opinions on this would be lovely!frontI lengthened the back by one full inch by extending the crotch curve.  This was a mistake because the inseam of this pair is 1 inch forward of where it should be. forward inseamThis is a good lesson to learn!  I should have left the crotch alone and slashed and spread the length of the CB seam instead to get the length I needed.  This would have left the inseam in its proper place. I did need to taper both the CB seam, the yoke and the waistband to fit the curve of my lower back.  backThis was no big surprise, and since I was anticipating this adjustment as a last little fitting tweak, I constructed the back in such a way that the CB seam was the last to be stitched.  I attached the waistband to the jeans and fit the CB seam, taking in about 3/4″ at the waist and tapering it to the hip level.  Burda’s instructions suggested stitched the CB seam and topstitching it prior to attaching the waistband.  Well, I knew that was going to be an un-picking nightmare, so I went down a different construction street quite happily.

left sideright sideMy side seams are almost perfectly perpendicular to the floor, which is a good thing, and I don’t need to tell you fellow sewistas that I’m very happy about that.  After taking these pics, however, it’s obvious the back thighs need to be shortened – probably a good 4cm – so the wrinkling under my butt goes away. I have some thoughts on this and will share them next post.

The pockets have a decorative self-fabric binding, which I wasn’t sure about.  That could mean too many layers of denim to sew through, but after a couple of test runs on scraps I went ahead with it.  It’s a unique detail that I’ve never seen on jeans before.  Not that I’ve seen a lot of jeans in my life.  But anyways… Burda 1-2010-136 pocket binding I used a denim needle for this project, and it stitched through all 5 layers of denim at the turned-under ends of the pocket binding with no complaints.Burda 1-2010-136 pocketsThe topstitching pattern for the back pockets is all Burda’s.  I claim no credit for creativity.  But I like these pockets.Burda 1-2010-136 belt loopsThe belt loops were the other area I discarded Burda’s instructions.  I was supposed to stitch a long tube and turn it.  Uh.  Right.  I hate turning tubes of fabric on the best of slippery fabrics, so why would I want to do that on thick stretch denim?  So I serged both long edges of the belt loop piece and turned the edges in on themselves in thirds, exactly like all the RTW jeans I inspected.  It turned out to be a little wider in width than typical belt loops, so I took the opportunity to use one of the decorative stitches on my machine instead of just straight topstitching.bronze denimI didn’t use studs to reinforce any pocket corners on this pair, although I studied every single pair of DH’s and DD1’s jeans to see where the studs were used.  I wanted to keep this project simple without a lot of extraneous detail or embellishment.  The only new-to-me hardware issues were the stud button and shortening the metal zipper by hand, neither of which was difficult or stress-inducing.And I added 2 inches of length.  I may be vain, but IMHO, the added 2 inches give the illusion of longer legs than I really own.  😉 After finishing this pair and wearing them for a day, I can tell you I have more in the queue.  Thanks to all of you sewing bloggers who have documented the process of making your own jeans.  Without all your posts and pics and details and FO’s I would not have crossed the hurdle of jeans.  You know who you are.  😉 Burda 1-2010-136 back

Op Art Tee

Burda 02-2013-126This the second of three tops that I’m working on right now.  The third is in the toile stage because it must fit perfectly.  When you see the fabric, you’ll understand why!  Anyways, this lovely little tee with gathered raglan sleeves from Burda’s February issue – 02/2013 #126 – has been popping up all over the internet these days, and I know why!  It’s the perfectly fun take on the basic tee.

Burda 02-2013-126I cut a size down from my usual size – typical for knits, but I could have gone another size down through the shoulders and bust.  It’s a little loose, but it’s not going to fall off my shoulders or be guilty of any wardrobe malfunctions.  And it’s very very long.  I trimmed a good 5 inches from the bottom of this top and my bottom hem is 1.5 inches deep.  And there’s still enough length to pool at my waist during wear!

neck bindingThe only change I made was to not follow Burda’s directions for binding the neckline.  My experience with bound necklines in a knit is not fraught with pretty successes, so I thought I’d just do the standard neckline edging with a strip of self-fabric on the cross grain.  And I cut my length about 2 inches shorter than Burda suggested.  It’s good, but it could be a snugger fit around.

Burda 2-2013-126My conclusions on this one:  a great little tee pattern.  You can’t really see the gathers on the sleeves, but I like the shape of it and would highly recommend it anyone!