Vogue 8600

Vogue 8600 side front

Here’s my latest matelassé project, Marcy Tilton’s jacket.  It’s got a large, oversized collar and deep pleats at the waist for shaping.  The pattern photos must be made with a thin taffeta fabric, because the jacket looks super crisp.  Mine doesn’t because of the bulky fabric I chose to make. Mine also seems to have more shape, because the body inside it has waaay more shape than the model’s, which seem to sit perfectly straight from shoulder to hemline.

The matelassé was bulky and had a mind of its own, so each seam and box pleat is catch-stitched down in order to ‘press’ the seams.  Pressing a scrap of the matelassé completely flattened it. Not good.  I tried ‘pressing’ the pleat edges through the hem bands in the front as the line drawing indicates so that they’d be crisp, but the fabric moves a lot on its own, and the edges/corners would not lay flat.  So I left them alone as a nod at a peplum look.

Vogue 8600 side front 2

The cuffs are very deep – about 8 inches (20cm) – and are designed to be folded back, if desired.  I’ve been wearing them not quite doubled back in half as they seem too short exactly in half, and too long not folded up at all.  And the back pleats release at the bottom of the shoulder blades.  I made a sway back adjustment, and shortened the waist on this version, but you can see how it balloons out in the back while being worn.  I’m sure most of this is due to my fabric choice.

Vogue 8600 back

As mentioned in my previous post, the front facings, undercollar and hem facings were all cut from a crinkle polyester taffeta from deep stash.  The lining is rayon bemberg in a tone-on-tone match with the crinkle taffeta.  No one’s going to see it, because this jacket looks pretty weird unbuttoned.  Here’s the underside of the collar.

Vogue 8600 under collar

See how large this thing is?  It looks fabulous as a dramatic collar, but it’s not quite big enough to keep one’s head warm.

Vogue 8600 collar

My final thoughts on this:  It’s an interesting fabric in an interesting jacket pattern.  I think if I had made it out of a crisp taffeta (suggested fabric, btw), it would have looked like a box with a big collar on me. It has an extraordinary amount of ease – no FBA required! I have long wanted to make up this pattern, just for the collar, and I’m happy I did.

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Bound Buttonholes and Matelassé

matelasse taffeta bound buttonholes

I’m working on another matelassé jacket, and kinda sorta wanted to do bound buttonholes.  I used a crinkle polyester taffeta, stabilized with fusible interfacing, as the contrast binding and the facing on the centre front pieces of the jacket.

crinkle taffeta facing

The matelassé is a gold/olive green/black weave in I guess what you would call a ‘patchwork’ pattern. The gold crinkle taffeta was the best match from my stash.

Vogue 8600 buttonholes

Can I just tell you that I decided to make bound buttonholes after the facing and collar was attached?  I had planned to go the lazy machine-stitched buttonhole route, but after a series of trials on scraps, decided bound buttonholes would look the best.  Instead of a straight-forward set of buttonholes, this became a fiddling-redo-rip-out-redo game, but I’m happy with the results.

What’s the best make-it-unnecessarily-difficult-extra-work decision you’ve ever made on a project?